Relationship Counseling

Pre-Marital Counseling

Dr. Fine’s work with Marital Conflicts through the years has made her a strong advocate of Pre-Marital Counseling.

Pre-Marital Counseling is a growing trend in the twenty first century. Research indicates that fifty percent of all marriages end in divorce. Pre-Marital Counseling is proactive as it seeks to prevent negative relationship habits from forming. Pre-Marital Counseling can significantly reduce the risk of divorce and will lead to a happier marriage. The process strengthens your relationship by increasing your ability to Communicate and Problem Solve as a couple. It addresses issues such as Finances, Child Rearing, Intimacy and Sexuality. It allows you to set Realistic Mutual Goals as well as address Unrealistic Expectations.

Marital Counseling

Dr. Fine has specialized training and focus on a couples relationship. She believes all marriages can be tested at times and it is prudent to seek help before the relationship starts to deteriorate.

Marriage counseling is usually short term and can help couples rebuild their relationship by assisting to resolve conflicts and by giving couples the tools to communicate in a healthy way. This helps strengthen a couples bond and create a deeper understanding.

Co-dependency Issues

Dr. Fine believes that Co-Dependency is an emerging issue has extensive experience and success working with the issues Co-Dependency. One of her core beliefs is that it will be difficult to stop being tormented by other’s behaviors unless one takes responsibility for themselves. Sometimes, Co-Dependency can be defined as a normal reaction to other’s abnormal behavior.

It is normal to want to protect the people we care about and to be affected by and react to the problems of others. However, a Co-dependent person is one who has let another person’s behavior affect them and who is obsessed with controlling that person’s behavior. Co-dependents constantly give to others and don’t know how to receive. This becomes a very destructive cycle for the person and prevents them from finding their own peace and happiness. Co-dependent people often are so involved in the drama of someone else’s life, they have lost site of their own. They can become angry, exhausted and empty. They often find themselves in the backdrop of another’s problems.

Goals of treatment may include:

  • To help one to find happiness within themselves, rather than within another.
  • To be independent thinkers.
  • To accept, honor and trust yourself.
  • Not to be responsible for or dependent on another.
  • Be able to feel their own feelings.
  • Learning how to express ones self.
  • To move forward.

Getting the help to move forward is often the most difficult. Once the “dance of Co-Dependency” is acknowledged moving forward becomes a natural process.